Viktor Wynd’s Museum of Curiosities | London

The Last Tuesday Society

Halloween is creeping up on us so what better time to take you to a dark basement in East London, right? More precisely, we’re going to Hackney. There’s this strange-looking pub on Mare Street, with a black front and curious knick-knacks haphazardly displayed in its window. Inside the atmosphere is suitably lugubrious. On the ground floor, the Last Tuesday Society is a pub like no other. As your eyes get used to the poorly lit environment, you may notice that patrons may look rather strange… Yes, you’re seeing that right, it’s a rather menacing stuffed lion wearing a top hat sat at that table! Now as much as this is definitely the most intriguing drinking institution I’ve been to, I’m actually here to tell you about what lies beneath it…

The Last Tuesday SocietyThe Last Tuesday SocietyThe Last Tuesday Society

Mention the museum to the bartender and you will be shown to a gaping hole on the ground where a staircase spirals down to a red-glowing mouth. Hold tight to the banister, a few more steps, please, please mind that one, and you’ve landed in Viktor Wynd’s Museum of Curiosities. There, a couple of rooms are lined with glass cabinets filled with so much stuff you don’t know where to start. There’s a lot of taxidermy as one expect from such places but the specimens are arranged in strange scenes, sometimes placed alongside surprisingly mundane objects. For instance, there’s this striking stuffed two-headed lamb standing right next to Dora the Explorer.

The Last Tuesday SocietyThe Last Tuesday SocietyThe Last Tuesday Society

The associations are mesmerising, you feel like you’ve just tapped into Viktor Wynd’s stream of consciousness. His interests are strangely intertwined behind the glass windows: tribal art, erotica, taxidermy, celebrity culture, Happy Meal toys and the flashy world of dandies. With his personal collection mixed with donations, Viktor Wynd wishes here to “recreate a 17th century Wunderkabinett with 21st century sensibilities”. The idea is not to educate but to leave the visitor with a sense of wonder. Undoubtedly, some pieces are awe-inspiring such as the perfect dodo skeleton, the precious glitter suit of celebrated dandy Sebastian Horsley or the predator bones lurking behind the bars of a cage at the back at the museum.

The Last TuesdayThe Last Tuesday SocietyThe Last Tuesday Society

But mostly, this little shop of horrors is deliciously facetious. A closer inspection to the book covers will make you blush, with titles like The Naughty Nun or Mrs Thompson’s Water Domination (!). And look at that angry stuffed chihuahua taking cover under the giant crab! It’s also well worth reading the labels on the various pots and jars exhibited on the shelves. There are some very puzzling spontaneous donations such as Russell Brand’s pubes (which are actually beard trimmings sent by his hairdresser), Amy Winehouse’s (fake) poo and Russell Crowe’s (actual) wee. The world of Viktor Wynd is undoubtedly fascinating but what you make of it is the added reward.

The Last Tuesday Society
Practical Information

The Last Tuesday Society,
The Viktor Wynd Museum of Curiosities – website

11 Mare Street
London E8 4RP

Opening Hours
12pm – 10.30pm (Wed-Sun; same hours as the pub)
Tours are also organised

Admission
General £5 / Concessions £3 (includes a cup of tea & a guide book)

Bus
26, 48, 55, 106, 254, 388

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Memories from Mojácar | Spain

Mojácar

As I’m about to fly to Spain this week, I was reminded I had a few pictures of my Spanish adventures last year to share here. I’m going to be honest I had written off most of the coast as a sterile destination full of overdeveloped sea resorts. There are certainly quite a few of those but let me tell you, I had to eat my hat hard.
While travelling along the South Coast, I was completely blown away by the variety of landscapes: from towering sea cliffs to green valleys via miles of desert (it’s no wonder that the old Hollywood crowd used to come here to shoot some of their classic Western movies). It dawned on me that this would be the perfect setting for an epic road-trip. Besides these, there are adorable villages of white-washed cube houses resting on top of hills. Like, for instance, Mojacar. It’s just too charming and I thought it had a certain air of Santorini.
But Mojacar is not only a pretty face, it is an important historical crossroad and it also has the strangest legend involving America’s most famous figure of all time.

MojácarMojácar

Located in the province of Almeria, the old pueblo of Mojacar is nestled at the top of a hill facing the Mediterranean sea and the tourist resort of Mojacar playa. It is thought to have been populated since the Bronze Age. It’s been under the rule of the Greeks, Rome and in the 8th century, the Moors took over. The town was actually once on the frontier with the Christian civilisation to the East which led to many invasions and blood baths in the 15th century. Up until a pact of free association was agreed between the local Moors, Jews and Christians at the fountain Fuento Moro, which you can still visit today. Locals regularly come here to fill up plastic bottles.

MojácarMojácarMojácar

Mojacar bloomed for centuries as it welcomed diverse traders inside its walls but ultimately it fell into decay in the 19th century. In the 1960s, the local mayor reversed the trend by giving away pieces of land to a community of artists. Today the town is an interesting combination of different architecture styles basked in a bohemian aura. Amongst the expected souvenir shops, you’ll find arts and crafts shops as well as vintage sellers.

MojácarMojácarMojácarMojácarMojácar

It’s better to explore the meandering alleyways by foot, you can pick up Mojacar map from the tourist centre. You’ll notice along the way many beautiful details: iron-wrought doors and windows, potted plants, vibrant bougainvillea, blue tiles, orange trees and the Moorish pebble-covered paths which were thought to be beneficial for the back. You will also notice that several house-fronts sport a match-stick man carrying a rainbow. This is the Indalo (or Mojacar Man), a drawing from the Bronze Age found in a nearby cave and thought to cast off the evil eye and bring good luck. This symbol of Mojacar became so popular that it now represents the whole province of Almeria. The town also features a couple of miradors which boast spectacular panoramic views stretching to the Mediterranean Sea. Mirador del Castillo is the highest point of town, you shouldn’t miss it!

MojácarMojácar

Now onto that bizarre local legend… Rumour has it that Mojacar is actually the birthplace of Walt Disney. I know, crazy, right? It is believed he was the child of an illegitimate liaison and emigrated later in the US. The Guardian has an interesting article on the subject if you’re into your conspiracy theories *grins*

Irish Summer Checklist Revisited

Irish Summer Checklist Revisited

Since we’ve just entered the month of September (sigh), I thought we could look at my Irish Summer Checklist from last year again and see what I’ve managed to do so far!

Irish Summer Checklist Revisited
✓ Go on hikes around Dublin
I did the Howth Cliff Walk and went up the Hellfire Club. The Bray Head hike is next on my list!
✓ Taste Murphy’s ice-cream (Dublin)
I went for the classic Brown Bread and Dingle Sea Salt flavours.
✗ See the mills in Skerries (Dublin)
✗ Visit the Burren Perfumery (co. Clare)
✗ Get lost in Russborough’s maze (co. Wicklow)
Irish Summer Checklist Revisited
✓ Visit Drimnagh Castle (Dublin)
You can read on my visit to this Norman castle here.
✓ Photograph the roses in Saint Anne’s Park (Dublin)
Click here to read my account of the day.
✗ Go back to Killruddery to do a tour of the house (co. Wicklow)
✓ Wander in Mount Usher Gardens (co. Wicklow)
I’m giving you a tour of these spectacular gardens here.
✓ Stand in the lavender field in Kilmacanogue (co. Wicklow)
More on this little patch of Provence in Wicklow here.

6 out of 10 is not too bad I reckon! Of course I might have updated my list but I’ll keep that for a new version next Summer. The month of September is often a good one here, weather-wise, so I’m hoping I can cross off a few more these coming weeks!

On an unrelated note, I wanted to say a huge thank you to those of you who voted for me in the Littlewoods Ireland Blog Awards competition, The Art of Exploring has made it to the finals! I’m completely floored by your kindness, thank you from the bottom of my heart!

Summer Days in London

Summer Days in London
Last month I went for my annual trip to London and as always I had the best time exploring my favourite city. I only stayed a long weekend and this time I felt like taking it easy and didn’t pack as much as my last trip. A lot of time was spent in parks just basking in the sun, it was wonderful. I thought I would write a quick and casual summary of what I was up to during these few blissful day because there were a few great London discoveries that were made.

When your breakfast spot has the prettiest facade on the street 💕
Day 1 started with a lovely breakfast at Well Street Kitchen. I opted for the granola and greek yogurt topped by a deliciously tart berry compote. Portions were generous and everything was well done and fresh (bar the OJ that tasted like it was cut with concentrate juice which was slightly disappointing). The digestion phase was spent sitting in the nearby park and observing the people passing by. It always strikes me how close-knitted the East-end community looks like from afar, everybody seems to be talking to each other.
Summer Days in London
Summer Days in Dublin
Next I hopped on a bus to Islington High Street. I had briefly window-shopped there before, it’s quite a vibrant area with an interesting mix of shops. I took advantage of being in the area to check out Home & Pantry, an independent Interior Shop I had long wanted to visit. But the real reason I was in the area was to go to the Victoria Miro Gallery to see the Yayoi Kusama exhibition. This was first on my ‘London wishlist’ this year as I really didn’t want to miss it before it closed. I had previously seen Kusama’s work before in the Tate back in 2012 and absolutely loved her universe. This time the exhibition seemed to focus on reflections, ripples and pumpkins. It was a completely mind-blowing experience to stand in the room of ‘All the Eternal Love I have for the Pumpkins‘.
Summer Days in London
Afterwards, I went to Spitalfields market where I had a late lunch at Leon. I had heard of their sweet potato falafel box and thought it sounded like a great combination. It turns out it was a tad bland, it was nice but nothing to write home about. I immediately got luncheon remorse when I noticed that Pilpel was just outside the market hall. Oh well, you win some, you lose some… I wanted to wander in the area to take pictures of the old Georgian streets. I went back to Folgate Street where stands the molto brilliantissimo Dennis Severs House and explored Fournier Street and Princelet Street for the first time. These were honestly two of the most beautiful streets I had ever trod on, pure film set material.
Summer Days in London
The day’s explorations ended with a walk along Brick Lane and a quick look to the facade of the Whitechapel Bell Foundry. It was unfortunately closed by the time I got there but it’s a fascinating place, full of history, as it is here that Big Ben and the Liberty Bell were cast. I definitely need to come back during business hours.
Summer Days in LondonSummer Days in London
On Day 2, I went to Sutton House. This I will need to write a post about but it is a beautiful Tudor manor, the oldest residential building in Hackney actually. It used to belong to Ralph Sadleir, a courtier of the terrifying Henry VIII. You can visit the many rooms but if you don’t care much for history there’s also a tea house and a cafe. The inner courtyard is a wonderful little place to sit down and have a cuppa.
Summer Days in London
And on the final day, I went to Camden Market. I hadn’t been there in years! Even though my recollection of it was the most crowded place in London, I’m pretty sure it managed to get even busier since the last time I was here. The market stalls expanded quite a bit too. The food variety would make anyone’s head spin (especially if you suffer from option paralysis like me). Unrelated question but does anyone know what happened to the group of punks who would always hang out by the bridge? Did the crowds make them run away and hide? Is punk dead?
Summer Days in LondonSummer Days in London
Following that, I was in dire need of a quieter and greener place so I took off and headed to Primrose Hill. But first, I stopped by Wholefoods to get a few snacks for an impromptu picnic. Another overwhelming place for little old indecisive me but I managed to get out with some interesting quinoa crisps and novelty pop corn as well as a refreshing cold-pressed watermelon juice.
On my way to the top of the hill, I crossed a couple walking 5 dachshunds. Their little stumpy legs were working hard! Incidentally, this is not the first time I see 5 dachshunds on a hill!
Primrose Hill offers fantastic view over the London skyline (although I think I might prefer the view from Hampstead Heath). The wind was strong at the top and some kids were flying kites. Which meant I had Mary Poppins Let’s Go Fly a Kite looping in my head all afternoon!
Summer Days in London
I noticed the hill was not too far from Little Venice so I hopped on the canal pathway and lazily wandered along the water. I’m actually not sure I even went through Little Venice (?), I walked until I met a dead-end. It was such a pleasant stroll, the canal was bordered by grandiose-looking manors. Back onto the streets, I found my way to the nearest tube station. Next stop: Westminster!
Summer Days in London

Summer Days in London
I hadn’t seen Big Ben in years! It still takes my breath away and fills me with nostalgia, bringing me back to being a teenager discovering London for the first time. I’m forever impressed with this city’s grandeur, the Houses of Parliament look like it was chiselled from ice and the Thames so strong, ploughs through the city like a thousand concrete-coloured stallions. Just as I was crossing Westminster Bridge, I noticed a group of Asian couples in the middle of a wedding photoshoot. It was just the weirdest thing, the brides wore sneakers under their beautiful tulle dresses and gave their best smiles to bossy photographers.
I patiently waited for them to finish their shoot and headed to that little tunnel under the bridge to take that famous framed picture of Big Ben. Unfortunately the light was pants but as I crossed to the other side of the bridge, I was welcomed by the warm golden hour.
Summer Days in London

This was the perfect ending to another successful trip to this city I love so much. It was great to chill and revisit old favourites. I’m quite chuffed with the new places I saw too. But now it was time to go to the “Second star to the right and straight on ’til morning” and bid good bye to London. Until next time old friend!

Drimnagh Castle | Dublin

Drimnagh Castle

Did you know that the only castle with a flooded moat left in Ireland can be found in Dublin? You’d think with such a title, the castle would also be ‘flooded’ with tourists. Not quite. It is a bit of a locals’ secret probably due to the fact that it’s located rather far off the tourist track. In fact, the castle was completely unknown to me despite having lived in Dublin for 8 years! It is located in the capital’s South West suburbs, in a residential area called Drimnagh.

Drimnagh Castle

Case in point, when I finally visited this Norman Castle earlier this year, I practically had the whole place to myself bar a group of kids from the primary school next door. I had unfortunately just missed the tour guide but the helpful volunteers in care of the grounds kindly let me in and provided lots of information.

Drimnagh Castle was built around 1215 by the De Bernivale (sometimes spelt Barneville and later anglicized as Barnewall). They had received the land in recognition for their services during the Crusades and the invasion of Ireland. They resided here for 400 years.

See also: Love Irish Castles? Check out this Norman Castle just outside Dublin

Drimnagh CastleDrimnagh Castle

The castle you see today had been updated throughout the years: the main castle on the right of the tower dates back from the 15th century, the tower was built in the 16th, the porch and the stairway in the 19th and various buildings were added during the last century.

It also holds the title of being the longest inhabited castle in Ireland but by the mid-1980s it had completely fell into ruins. Thankfully the local community and An Taisce (The National Trust for Ireland) intervened and brought the place back to its old glory. They even added a beautiful 17th century-style garden.

Drimnagh CastleDrimnagh Castle

Inside the castle, the piece de resistance is without a doubt the Great Hall. It has a gorgeous red and black tiled floor, an imposing mantelpiece and curious carved oak figures adorning the walls. Back in the day, the hall had a dual purpose of sleeping quarters cum living room. During the day, the mattresses were replaced by tables and benches.

Drimnagh Castle is certainly a charismatic place and it won’t surprise you that it was used as a shooting location for several productions among which The Tudors and Ella Enchanted.

See also: Killruddery and Powerscourt Estate were also filming locations for the TV show The Tudors.

Drimnagh Castle

DRIMNAGH CASTLE PRACTICAL INFORMATION

Drimnagh Castle – website
Long Mile Road
Dublin 12

Admission
General €4.50 / Students & OAPs €4 / Children €2.50

Opening Hours
9am-4pm (Mon-Thu)
9am-1pm (Fri)

Bus
18, 56A, 151

 

The Art of Exploring shortlisted for an award!

Happy Times

HAPPY TIMES indeed! I’m delighted to tell you that my blog has been nominated for best travel blog in the Littlewoods Ireland Blog Awards! I’m not going to lie the competition is tough, so many travel bloggers with great talent out there but if you would like to support my blog, you can go directly to this link and give me a little click. Voting will be open until this Tuesday, the 23rd of August. Thank you <3

Rose Festival & North Bull Island | Dublin

Rose Festival & North Bull Island

It was a hot afternoon in July, I had just come back from London, right in time for Saint Anne’s Park Rose Festival. I had been wanting to visit the park and its yearly floral event for a quite a while now. Every July, for a weekend, the beautiful rose gardens are celebrated by the local community. Families gather the time of a weekend, to enjoy the festivities. The cheerful atmosphere actually reminded me a lot of the Bloom Festival. Plant sales, craft stands, food stalls were lined up in the park’s paths while a band was giving the crowds a soundtrack for that happy Summer day. The kids were flying mini kites or queuing for a ride on the carrousel. And let’s not forget the star of the weekend, roses in their different shape or colour were admired in one of Dublin’s best rose gardens.

Rose Festival & North Bull Island
Rose Festival & North Bull Island
Rose Festival & North Bull IslandRose Festival & North Bull Island
Rose Festival & North Bull Island
Rose Festival & North Bull IslandRose Festival & North Bull Island

St Anne’s park is located in the north of Dublin bay, between Clontarf and Raheny. It offers many interesting features, aside from the rose garden. Most prominently, many follies in decay but also a walled garden and a clock tower, as well as the Red Stables which houses an arts centre, a cosy little cafe and markets on the weekend. And last but not least, there’s a line of oaks that bears a striking resemblance to the Dark Hedges from TV show Game of Thrones. This park is so fun and its diverse landscape made me think of my childhood grounds, le Parc Solvay in Brussels. This might just be my new favourite park in Dublin!

Another great thing about this park is that it’s facing the seashore, more precisely the entrance to North Bull Island. I had never been there so I decided to kill two birds with one stone while I was in the area and pay it a visit.
Rose Festival & North Bull IslandRose Festival & North Bull IslandDublin Rose Festival & North Bull Island

The road to the island crosses salt marshes which holds a UNESCO protected bird sanctuary. Dublin is actually the only capital city which has an entire biosphere reserve within its walls. At the end of the causeway, you’ll find dunes and the man-made beach Dollymount Strand. It’s a beautiful sandy beach which offers great views on the Dublin bay, on one side, the Poolbeg Chimneys stand tall while on the other side, Howth head lies on the fluffy sea.

Quick Guide to Le Puy-en-Velay | France

Le Puy-en-Velay

Here is the second and last part of my trip to Auvergne last Summer. During my stay in Saint-Julien-Chapteuil, my friends and I spent an afternoon in Le Puy-en-Velay. This medieval town is famously known to be one of the starting points of the Camino de Santiago. And what a spot to start a pilgrimage, the city charms with its cobbled stones and its pastel blind-cladded windows. We wandered in its alleyways on that hot afternoon of July, with no real plan but as fate would have it we got to experience some of Le Puy’s greatest features.

Le Puy-en-VelayLe Puy-en-Velay

LE PUY CATHEDRAL

Without a doubt the star of Le Puy-en-Velay, this monument that sits up above the town. Hence, it is a bit of a steep climb to get there, especially the stair part but believe me it will be all worth it. The cathedral offers stunning views over the city’s rooftops and you get to walk in the steps of the Camino de Santiago‘s pilgrims. This is where they start their journey after getting released through the cathedral’s doors and being blessed in the morning.
Other points of interest in the cathedral include the 12th century cloister and the Black Virgin, Our Lady of Le Puy, which is the object of another pilgrimage celebrated every 15th of August (2016 is a big one as it coincides with the jubilee that happens every 11 years).

Le Puy-en-Velay

HOTEL SAINT-VIDAL

Next to the cathedral is the Hotel Saint-Vidal which is the designated reception centre for the pilgrims who are looking for information, accommodation or a place to gather and socialise. It hosts Le Camino, a museum on the pilgrimage history, as well as Le Cafe des Pelerins, which has the most enchanting little courtyard. My friends and I ordered much needed refreshments after the dreary cathedral’s staircase and sat there for a while, enjoying the calm surroundings. Added bonus, the bar staff was super friendly and answered all our questions on their role in welcoming the travelling pilgrims.

Le Puy-en-Velay

THE “RENAISSANCE” MURAL

It’s completely by accident that we stumbled upon Patrick Commecy’s mural. His trompe-l’oeils are pure magic, maybe you’ve seen his work on the Internet before? He paints realistic scenes on boring blank city walls that fit into their surroundings so well. He also likes to incorporate details that evoke the place’s history. Look closely to “Renaissance” and you’ll spot all Le Puy’s specialities: the green lentils, the lace-makers, the verbena liquor Verveine, the pilgrims and “Le Roi de L’Oiseau” (literally the Bird King), the yearly renaissance festival for which occasion the mural has been commissioned.

Le Puy-en-Velay

NOTRE-DAME DE FRANCE

Notre-Dame de France is a giant statue of the Virgin Mary that dominates the city. Its peculiar rusty colour is due to the fact it was made from the cannons brought back from the Crimean War. It is located on the Rocher Corneille, a volcanic formation from which height you can enjoy panoramic views over the city.

Le Puy-en-VelayLe Puy-en-Velay

THE POUZAROT QUARTER

The Pouzarot is the oldest neighbourhood in Le Puy. It goes back to the Middle Age when it was built after the discovery of a water source. This part of town feels like a village inside the city. The facades are adorned with exposed bricks and greenery abound in between the cosy cottages.

Le Puy-en-VelayLe Puy-en-Velay
Le Puy-en-Velay

Le Puy is a lively and culturally rich place, we barely scratched the surface. For instance, I wish we had time to climb to St-Michel d’Aiguilhe, a chapel located on another volcanic rock in the North of the city. But even lacking a plan or a map, this welcoming city opens its arms to the pilgrims and the tourists alike without any resistance.

Postcards from Saint-Julien-Chapteuil | France

Saint-Julien-ChapteuilSaint-Julien-Chapteuil

Last Summer, I went to a tiny village nestled among the volcanic hills of Auvergne called Saint-Julien-Chapteuil. I was to spend a week there with my friend and her sweet little family who had recently relocated from Belgium. I was especially eager to finally meet their adorable baby. Two trains and some seven hours later, Brussels far far behind me, I was sitting in her van in a middle of an intense catch-up session while she was driving us to the village I had heard so much of already.

Saint-Julien-Chapteuil

The week spent there was one of the most peaceful of my life. Every morning, I’d be woken by Saint Julien’s bells. More often than not, I would ignore them and fall back asleep. We were living on baby schedule, time before noon was slow and cosy, you would probably find me in the kitchen window stuffing my face with apricots. We had bought a whole crate for a ridiculous price at the end of the market. In the afternoons, if the sun wasn’t too hot, we would go on hikes in the mountains surrounding the village. The volcanic region offers some interesting rock formations like “basalt organ pipes” not unlike the one you can see at the Giant’s Causeway.

Saint-Julien-ChapteuilSaint-Julien-Chapteuil

The views over the valley were breathtaking and the air so pure. So was the water, can you believe the tap water tasted better than bottled?!

The evenings were spent cooking with good wholesome food. Sometimes we would set our table on the terrace, facing the mountains where the sun would eventually lie, lighting the sky orange and violet. And as the stars shone bright in a star-gazer’s perfect dream, we would play cards until our eyelids felt heavy. I would fall asleep to the song of cicadas, sometimes punctuated by the cymbals of thunderstorms.

Saint-Julien-Chapteuil

Ever since I left Saint-Julien-Chapteuil, I’ve been thinking of its slower pace of life (certainly enhanced by our lack of wifi) and its wonderfully old-fashioned events like the soapbox races and the Soup festival where people from the surrounding villages would come and gather in Saint Joseph’s school courtyard to eat cabbage soup, drink wine and dance to the old French tunes sung by an old lady with a quivering voice. For a long time, London has been on my mind but as I grow older, I feel ready for a change of pace.

What about you? Could you see yourself living in a village in the middle of nowhere or are you a city person through and through?
Next week, I’ll show you Le-Puy-en-Velay where we spent an afternoon. This picturesque town is famous for being one of the starting points of the Santiago de Compostela’s pilgrim route.

Kylemore Abbey | co. Galway

Kylemore Abbey

Seeing Kylemore Abbey roll out over the horizon when you drive down the N59 is something that must be experienced once in a life-time. A few years ago, My friend and I were road tripping in the Connemara when we both simultaneously gasped and squealed at the sight of the castle standing majestically over a mirror-like lake. This is the kind of stuff fairy-tales are made of.

You can visit the ground floor of the castle where you’ll learn of its history. It was built in the 1860s by Mitchell Henry, a wealthy London doctor, for his wife Margaret who fell in love with the region. They lived there very happily and had 9 (!) children. Alas, their story took a tragic turn when Margaret died of a fever during a trip to Egypt. Inconsolable, Mitchell built a Gothic Church and a mausoleum in honour of his wife, which you can still visit today in Kylemore. He left the premises, pained by the memory of his wife too present there. The castle was then acquired by the Duke and Duchess of Manchester who had to let it go a few years later due to gambling debts.
Kylemore Abbey
Kylemore Abbey
Kylemore Abbey
Kylemore AbbeyKylemore Abbey

This brings us to 1920 and the current owners of the estate, the Benedictine nuns. They were looking for a new home after their Belgian monastery was destroyed in World War I. They found it in Kylemore Castle which then became Kylemore Abbey. They still live there today, living off admissions, donations and the handmade goods they sell at the gift shop.
Kylemore AbbeyKylemore Abbey
Kylemore Abbey
Kylemore Abbey
Kylemore Abbey

Unfortunately, I wasn’t as enthralled by the rooms of Kylemore Abbey as I was for its outside. For me the true gem of the estate is the Victorian Walled Garden. Nestled between hilltops, the abbey gardens are a stunning example of Irish landscaping. Inside the stone walls, you’ll find a vegetable garden, orchards, glasshouses and the Head Gardener’s house. The latter’s period rooms are beautifully laid out in pastel hues. I can’t start to imagine the life led by those who took care of this land, an oasis between lake and mountains.
Kylemore Abbey

KYLEMORE ABBEY PRACTICAL INFORMATION

Kylemore Abbey – website
Connemara
co. Galway, Ireland

Admission
General €13 / Seniors €10 / Student €9 / Children under 10 Free

Opening Times
9.30am-5.30pm (Every Day, Mar-Nov)
9am-7pm (Every Day, July-Aug)
10am-4.30pm (Every Day, Nov-March)