June Blake’s & Hunting Brook Gardens | co. Wicklow

Visiting gardens is just about my favourite thing to do. As soon as the weather warms up you’ll find me exploring a few ones, especially in county Wicklow. This county is chock-full of gorgeous gardens and it’s fairly accessible with transport from Dublin. I’ve made a good dent on my bucket list and while I ticked most of the big ones in this beautiful county, I had yet to visit any private gardens. Today, I’m sharing not one but two of these here.
Located just outside Blessington in West Wicklow, June Blake’s Garden and Hunting Brook Garden are only a couple of miles apart. They are owned by two siblings, but they couldn’t be any more different.

When you get to June Blake’s Garden, you first go through a grand avenue shaded by big majestic trees which opens to an open field view. Follow along the road until you reach the parking lot. You’ll see first June Blake’s stables which house two rooms that you can rent for the night.
How wonderful would it be to wake up here one morning?
As you make your way towards the garden, you’ll pass by the tea-room where you can pay the entrance charge. There’s a small menu of soups, cakes and scones. On the dresser, you’ll find a small selection of gifts to buy such as gardening books and prints.

June Blake’s Garden is small, it spreads over 3 acres but it’s jam-packed with flowers, dry grass and other plant delights. In the middle of it stands a charming little stone cottage. There’s also a reflective rectangle pool and lots of benches where you can sit and relax.
Inspect any plant borders and you get the feeling that June has made the best use of every inch of the garden’s soil. At first glance, the space looks a bit wild in a romantic English garden kind of way when they are left to do their own thing. But give it a second look and you’ll see that this is not the result of nature’s chance but of someone who knows how to work with nature’s timing and complimentary tones. The colours bounce off each other and different stalk heights fill the space in an eye-pleasing way. June Blake is the unequivocal maestro of this vibrant symphony.


I visited in the late Summer and the garden was dotted with beautiful autumnal jewel tones. Oranges, burgundy, marigold and purple. The star of the show might have just been the dahlia for me, they come in so many interesting shapes, from a star-like flower to a full jolly pompom. I was so happy to catch them in season. This flower is just so nostalgic to me. They remind me of my childhood Summers spent in my parents’ garden. I would admire my 80 year old neighbour’s garden through the fence. She was mad for dahlias and let me tell you, when her garden was filled with a thousand of them, it was a joyful sight!
I’d be curious to come back to June Blake’s garden at different times of the year and see how it wears the different seasons. Tulip season is said to be a stunner!

I did several laps of the garden with my camera in hand, high on all the smells and the constant buzzing of the bees. It was the perfect opportunity to crack out my 50mm lens! I then quickly stopped by the tea room to savour a wholesome vegetable soup with a slice of gluten-free rye bread.

Following that, I headed to Hunting Brook Gardens which is located a couple of miles away. It is owned by June Blake’s brother, Jimi and it is abundant with plants and flowers. Indeed, Jimi Blake owns one of Ireland’s largest private plant collections. He brings a lot of plants from his travels which you can follow on his Instagram. And if you like the look of his work, you might be interested to know that he’s releasing a gardening book ‘A Beautiful Obsession‘ in September.

Just as I entered the garden, I was greeted by Jimi’s dog, Doris, who requested a back scratch. Of course, I happily complied and as I let my eyes wander around me, I realised that this garden has a very different atmosphere. It has a certain jungle quality to it, it feels leafier and experimental with a soupçon of mystique. The focal point is a timber house which is Jimi’s home but it is also the space where he teaches his gardening classes. On the porch, you’ll find the plant sale section.
What’s extraordinary about this garden is the surprising mix of exotic plants and perennials. Banana leaves growing next to a purple baby breath? Totally normal in Hunting Brook Gardens!

I was in total awe with the plant border next to the garden entrance, where succulents and cactuses seem to be thriving. It’s not something you would often see outdoors in Ireland as they are generally confined to green houses.
At the back of the garden, there’s a path that will lead you to a magical little woodland nestled in a small valley. Through it flows a rocky mountain stream, Hunting Brook, that gave the gardens their name. The trail loops back through a meadow which offers stunning views over the Wicklow Mountains and the countryside’s patchwork of fields.

Want to explore more gardens in county Wicklow? Check out my posts on Mount Usher Gardens, Killruddery Gardens and Powerscourt Gardens.

PRACTICAL INFORMATION

June Blake’s Garden – website
Tinode, Blessington
co. Wicklow

Hunting Brook Garden – website
Lamb Hill, Tinode, Blessington
co. Wicklow

Opening Hours
11am-5.30pm, Wed-Sun (From April to late September)
On Sundays, there’s a guided tour of June Blake’s garden at 2.30pm
You can book group tours at both of the gardens

Admission
General €6 / Children Free

Bus
65 (‘June Blake’s Garden’ stop / ‘Kilbride Antique Shop’ for Hunting Brook Garden)

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Poolbeg Peninsula | Dublin

If you lived in Dublin for a certain period of time, chances are that the landmark you associate the most with the city is the Poolbeg Chimneys. Not Temple Bar or the Ha’penny Bridge or even Trinity College, no, those candy-striped chimneys are our version of an Eiffel Tower. Pretty much from anywhere in the Dublin Bay, you can see their familiar silhouette sticking out on the horizon.
And if like me, you travel by boat, they are more than a landmark. They mean you made it home as they welcome you when you enter Dublin Port. For that reason, I was quite excited to do the Poolbeg Peninsula Walk as it meant I got to finally see these two ladies from up close!

There are several starting points to the Poolbeg Peninsula but the most scenic trail begins at the Irishtown entrance. As you follow the peninsula outline, the Dublin shore on your right extends from Sandymount Strand, with its front of colourful houses, to the recognisable port of Dún Laoghaire.
Looking out from the shore, you’d be forgiven to think the peninsula is an absolute wasteland, especially with the waste management facility looming over it. But don’t be too quick to judge as once you enter it, a treasure of fauna and flora opens to you. To be honest, it’s almost easy to forget that the city’s waste is being burnt a few steps away from you.
I was actually surprised to discover that the peninsula is home to a nature reserve, the Irishtown Nature Park. The reserve was born from an idea that seemed completely mad in the 1970s: turn a dump full of waste and rubble into a nature spot. Volunteers gathered forces to make it into the space it is today, a home to many birds, insects and plant species. Quite an inspiring story that gives me a bit of hope for the future!

As you are getting deeper into the trail, the iconic Poolbeg Chimneys are getting closer. They are part of what used to be a power station but they have been disused since the early 2000s.
Did you know that one was taller than the other? Only 40 centimetres mind you! They are one of the tallest structures in Ireland, at a little more than 200m. They gained international fame when they featured in U2‘s music video for Pride (In The Name of Love). In 2014, they became protected to everyone’s relief as they had been previously threatened with demolition.

At the end of the Peninsula trail, there are a couple of beaches which would have looked idyllic if not for the giant eye-sore of the waste management facility behind it.

Tip: If you’re into photography or are looking for a nice insta backdrop, this is a great spot for a little Summer shoot what with the beach grass and the Poolbeg chimneys in the background.

It takes about 2km to get to the beginning of the Great South Wall from the Irishtown’s trail entrance. If you’re short of time, you can skip the trail and come by car (or taxi). There’s a handy parking space at the bottom of the Great South Wall..

The Great South Wall is one of the longest sea walls in Europe. You’ll have to walk nearly 2km to get to the Poolbeg Lighthouse. Half way through is the Half Moon Swimming and Water Polo Club. The old-fashioned blue and white cabins sure look charming on the pier but why would anyone want to swim at this exact spot is beyond me! It is the Dublin Port’s entrance after all, which comes with its heavy traffic of ferries and boats.

Quick advice, do mind your step as the granite path is uneven and only come here on a good weather day, you don’t want to be swiped by an angry wave!

There has been a lighthouse at the end of the sea wall since it was built in the late 18th century. It was first powered by candle-light (the first of its genre, it is said) but the podgy red tower you see today was built in 1820.
Do you know why the Poolbeg Lighthouse is red? In maritime convention, red means port, which is the left side of a boat. And if you look towards Howth, you’ll spot North Bull Lighthouse which is green. And green is for starboard (right side). Now you know!

Fun fact: Poolbeg Lighthouse is nearly equidistant of the Dublin shore, Dún Laoghaire and Howth. That makes it a great spot to admire the Dublin bay!

If you’re looking to escape the city but you’re short on time, it is the walk for you. Once you step in the peninsula, it’s hard to believe you are still in Dublin. The sound of the swishing beach grass and the sea air would cure any city fatigue.

A side note, there’s a talk of a plan to redevelop the area into a residential quarter with high-rise apartment blocks. While Dublin desperately needs new accommodation to alleviate the housing crisis, I can’t help but worry about what it means for the peninsula and its nature reserve. If you haven’t been yet, I’d say hurry and go explore Poolbeg before it changes forever.

PRACTICAL INFORMATION

The Poolbeg trail is easy to tackle, it is mostly flat (just be careful on the sea wall as the ground is uneven and sometimes wet)
From the shoreline to the Poolbeg Lighthouse, it is about 4 km. Count about 2 hours to go to the lighthouse and back to the shoreline.

Bus
18 (Dromard Terrace, the last stop in Sandymount)

Howth Castle | Dublin

Howth Castle

Up until recently, I had never heard of Howth Castle, despite going to Howth Village more times than I can remember. Judging from the reactions I had from some Dubliners, I was definitely not the only one oblivious to its presence. This 700 year old castle is literally hiding in plain sight on the peninsula of Howth.
You see, when you exit Howth Dart Station, you instinctively take a left, in the direction of the harbour. Next time go against your instinct and take a right until you reach the estate’s impressive stone gate entrance. It would be a shame to miss this estate, scene of a pirate legend and of one of the most famous monologues in Irish Literature.

Howth Castle

From the time you pass under the entrance gate, it’s a good 10 minute uphill walk until you see the castle. It’s an impressive sight.  Notice the layers of history in all the parts that were successively added to the structure through the ages.
There has been a Howth Castle since 1180 on the edge of Howth village but nothing is left from that original timber building. The oldest parts you can see today date back from the mid-15th century.

What’s fascinating is that the same family has been living here since 1180 thus making Howth Castle one of the oldest residential castles in Ireland, if not Europe. The Lawrence Family has been carrying all sorts of stories and traditions over 35 generations. One in particular involves a lady pirate, Grace O’Malley. Back in 1576, she wished to visit the castle but when she knocked on the doors, she found them shut tight. The Lawrence Family was too busy having dinner to receive her. Strongly offended, she orchestrated the kidnapping of the family’s young heir in retaliation. After much discussion, Grace and the Lawrence came to an agreement. She was to bring the boy safe home on the condition that the castle doors must always be open and that an extra seat must be set at the table for any unexpected guests. It is said that the family still honours their promise even to this day. Do you reckon I could show up tonight for a bite?

Howth Castle

If you’re interested to know more about the castle and the Lawrence family, you can take part to a tour between the months of April and September, on Sundays.
To be found also inside the castle is the National Transport Museum of Ireland as well as the cosiest cafe I ever did see. It is located in the courtyard. As soon as I stepped inside the Castle Cafe, I felt like I had been transported to someone’s private garden, albeit with a grandiose castle background. Little white cast iron tables and chairs are scattered on the lawn and there’s also seating available in the adorable conservatory. I heard they make scones everyday fresh out of their aga. It sounds absolutely heavenly, I’m dying to try them out with some yummy jam. They also serve afternoon tea in this idyllic setting.

Howth CastleHowth Castle

Outside the castle, you still have plenty to explore in the 250 acre gardens so hold on to your boots. First you’ll stumble upon the Deer Park Golf. At the time of my visit (early June), it was completely covered with buttercups which was ever so cheerful. I immediately had the urge to cross the field and walk towards the sea until I reached the park’s edge. Through the trees, I was surprised to see spreading in front of me Howth harbour and its tiny seafood restaurants. It’s a crazy thought, Howth Castle demesne had been here all along, only hidden by a handful of trees. I could see below the streets I had trodden, oblivious to the amazing treasure that was lying so close.
This sudden change of perspective made me feel a bit dizzy. What else have I not noticed around me? I had missed a bloody castle, after all!

Howth CastleHowth Castle

After spying on the village like a creepy puppet master for a while, I set off in the direction of the golf club’s bar. Near the parking lot, I watched a lone golfer practising his swing. Surely, he must have felt like the luckiest golfer alive facing the epic view over the peninsula’s entrance.

Behind the building is the start to the Rhododendron Walk. It goes through a forest of, you guessed it, rhododendrons. It looks so out of place, almost jungle-like, you would not necessarily expect to find a setting like this in Ireland.  The forest paths are covered with the trees’ exposed twisting roots, I felt like I had just been transported in the film Legend. I don’t think it would have totally surprise me to catch a glimpse of a unicorn in between the foliage.
Note that the rhododendron trees bloom from May to June so make sure to plan your visit around that time to experience the place to its full potential.

Howth Castle
At the start of the walk, you can go straight and climb steep steps that will lead you to the top of the Rhododendron hill. It might take a little effort but believe me the pay-off is worth every steps. I don’t think I exaggerate when I say that there you will find one of the most stunning views in Dublin. In my opinion, it ranks as high as the view from Killiney Hill. It sweeps over Howth Castle, Howth Harbour and the Ireland’s Eye. You can even see the Poolbeg Chimneys on the left!

Click here to read my post on Killiney Hill

Howth CastleHowth Castle

Now if you’d rather not climb any steps, you can take the path on your right to explore the forest grounds. There you’ll find an impressive dolmen, the 2nd heaviest in Ireland. It’s nicknamed Aideen’s Grave after a young widow who died of a broken heart following her husband’s death at the battle of Gabhra (AD 184). Unfortunately as romantic as this legend sounds, it can’t be true as the stone was dated at least 300 years older than the historic battle.

Howth CastleHowth Castle

Another fictitious love story was set among these trees. Indeed, it is here that Leopold Bloom proposed to Molly in James Joyce’s Ulysses. This is the scene of the most recognisable monologue in the book. Amongst these striking trees, she said yes she will yes. Who wouldn’t really?

See also: Drimnagh Castle, if you’re looking to visit another castle in Dublin

Howth Castle

PRACTICAL INFORMATION

Howth Castle – website 
Howth Demesne
co. Dublin

Opening Hours
Tours of the castle are available on Sunday afternoon from April to September, you can book your ticket here.

Admission
The demesne is free to roam while the entrance fee to the castle starts at €50

Dart
Howth Station

Your Ultimate Guide to Glendalough | co. Wicklow

Glendalough
If you ever spend some time in Ireland, chances are that you’ll get recommended a visit to Glendalough a fair few times. It took me the good part of a decade to finally set foot in the old Monastic City so you can imagine how many times I heard the whole Glendalough spiel. Well, now it’s my turn to lay it all on you! Glendalough is one of the most visited attractions in Ireland and for good cause, this natural wonder is positively ravishing. So what are you waiting for? I know I know, I get you, when you don’t drive, it can be a tad tricky (and as I found out even if you do have a car, getting there may come with its own set of hurdles) but fret not, after spending 4 days there, I’m here to help you make the most of your time and organise a hopefully all-round fuss-free trip to Glendalough, car or no car.

1. ABOUT GLENDALOUGH

Glendalough means in gaelic ‘valley of the two lakes’. The two lakes, the Lower Lake and the Upper Lake, were shaped as a result of the thaw following the Ice Age. You can find this awe-inspiring valley in county Wicklow (Dublin’s southern neighbour county). It is part of the Wicklow Mountains National Park, the biggest of the 6 national parks in Ireland.
Glendalough is famous worldwide for its grand Monastic City which you can still see in part today. The monastic settlement finds its origin back to the 6th century when Saint Kevin founded the place after falling in love with the beauty of the quiet valley.
For 600 years, the settlement flourished. You’ll have to imagine the place in its heyday, it comprised of farm buildings, guest houses, an infirmary and dwellings for the monks and the local population. The monks organised manuscript workshops and sold oak timber to the Vikings to build their fleet. It all came to an end after multiple raids carried out by the English and the final nail on the coffin came with Glendalough losing its ecclesiastical status to Dublin’s Diocese. It remained a local church and a place of pilgrimage for a while but soon enough the place fell in ruins. The monuments you see today mostly date from the 10th to the 12th century.

The site of Glendalough can be divided in 3 sections and this is what you will find in each of them:

The Lower Lake

This is where you will find the famous Monastic City. Coming from afar, the first thing you’ll probably see is Glendalough’s very recognisable Round Tower, standing tall at 30m. It is said to date back from the 10th century. The Monastic City has many other interesting features so keep an eye out for the grand archway, which has a unique design, St Kevin’s Church, also called ‘the Kitchen’ due to the shape of its chimney, the Priest’s House and the eerie Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul. If like me, you enjoy a graveyard full of Celtic crosses, you won’t be disappointed.
Fan of Irish folklore, legends and stories? Locate St Kevin’s Cross and try to wrap your arms around the cross to make your fingertips touch. There, all your wishes will be granted… or that’s what they say! Also don’t miss the Deer Stone which is said to have magical powers. Indeed, legend has it that if you splash your face with the water collected in its hollow, you might just keep your looks forever.
Next to the Monastic City are the Visitor Centre, the Glendalough Hotel and the first car park. In the Visitor Centre, there’s an exhibition and an audio-visual show (there’s an entrance fee of €5). If you want to book a tour guide of the Monastic City, you’ll have to contact the centre first by phone or fax.
Further down is the Lower Lake which you can cross thanks to a boardwalk or simply walk along its sides on a pathway.

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The Upper Lake

A good 20 minute walk through a beautiful oak woodland will take you from the Lower Lake to the Upper Lake. There, you will find the Information Centre where you can enquire about Glendalough’s hiking trails and the local flora and fauna. Guided walks are also available. If you are hiking, this is where all the trails start.
Outside, you will find the second car park with food stalls and restroom facilities.
At the bottom of the lake, there’s a makeshift beach and one of the site’s most fantastic view so don’t miss it!
Take the path on the left of the Lake and start your hike along the Poulanass River and Waterfall. On the right, walk through a rather enchanting pine forest for about an hour and you will get to the Miners Village. Keep an eye for Temple-Na-Skellig (the original site of St Kevin’s settlement) and Saint Kevin’s Cave, both of which can be seen on the opposite lakeshore.

Miners Village and Beyond

This was actually my favourite area in Glendalough. There’s something chillingly atmospheric about this village in ruins at the bottom of the valley. If you could go back in time to the 1850s, you’d see here a bustling mine. Lead, zinc and silver were mined by 2000 workers here and in the neighbour valley. Business lasted for a 100 years until the 1950s when the mines were eventually abandoned.
Today, only a few structures are left standing as well as an old piece of machinery. I’m not going to lie when you get here, you feel like you reached the entrance to the Mordor. The hill slopes are covered with discarded stones which feels like they’re about to tumble in a rockslide any minute. Stop for a bit and observe the unfazed, feral goats jump from one rock to another without a sweat. They’re amazing little creatures!
Further up the path, you can ascend along the river which flows into the Upper Lake. At the top, you will be met with the rolling views of the Glenealo Valley where a herd of sika deer generally gently graze. Turn around and here is the spectacular panorama over the Upper Lake.
Now with the Upper Lake in your back, you can either go straight ahead and explore the Glenealo Valley or take a left, cross the makeshift bridge over the river and hike uphill to get to the boardwalk. This will lead you to the Spinc, one of the most sought after scenic view of the region.

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2. GETTING THERE

By Public Transport

This is where things get a bit tricky and probably why it took me so long to visit Glendalough. There’s only one private bus company that serves the route between Dublin and Glendalough. Moreover, St Kevin’s Bus provides only two round trips a day (every day). The first one leaves Dublin at 11.30am which gets to Glendalough at 12.50pm and the last bus back to Dublin leaves Glendalough at 4.30pm (check the Summer and Winter timetables here). It is great if you plan to stroll on flat ground around the two Lakes, enjoy the hotel’s terrace, maybe squeeze in a small hike. But it will leave you on a tight schedule if you attempt one of the more challenging hikes (the longest hike on the map is 4 hours). But I personally wouldn’t recommend it as it’s best to allow some extra time in case something unexpected happens during the hike. I’m afraid your best option is to find a nearby accommodation for the night if you intend on fully exploring Glendalough.
One thing to keep in mind if you travel with St Kevin’s bus company is it can get extremely busy during the weekends, holidays and high tourist season. I took the bus from Dublin on a Tuesday in late August and it was so packed people had to stand for a few stops until the company called on an extra bus. I’d advise you to get to the bus stop early so you can get in the front of the queue to get a seat. A return ticket from Dublin is €20 which can be purchased on board (click here for a full list of fares).

Now another option would be to take the train to Rathdrum from Dublin. The trip takes a little more than an hour. From there, the company Wicklow Way Bus can pick you up and drive you directly to Glendalough. Be sure to book with them in advance by phone or email and let them know how many people will be there (you don’t need to be a group) and what time you plan to be at Rathdrum Station. The great thing is that they are available 7 days a week!

Lastly, you can go on a day tour with a private company. I can’t personally comment because I’ve never tried any but recently Wild Wicklow Tours, a family-run business that tours Glendalough and other places in county Wicklow, has been voted the best travel experience in Ireland and 10th in the world by Tripadvisor. It sounds like a safe choice to me!

By Car

The journey by car from Dublin to Glendalough, travelling on the N11, will take you a little more than an hour (it’s well posted, so just follow the signs). That is if you avoid the weekends, bank holidays and school holidays. In high season, Glendalough can get horridly congested and queues to the parking lots can get out of hand. So better plan a trip midweek or in low season if you don’t want to waste precious time on the road instead of enjoying the fresh mountain air.
Glendalough has two parking lots available. The first one in the Lower Valley, next to the Visitor Centre, comes with an entrance fee of €4 on weekends, bank holidays, Holy Week, Easter Week and during the months of June, July and August. It is free otherwise and open 24/7. The second one, next to the Upper Lake, will cost €4 at all times. It opens from 8am to varying times in the evening depending on the season so do check the signs before leaving the car park.
If you want to avoid parking in Glendalough, you can do so in the closest village, Laragh. There’s a parking lot on the main road to Glendalough that will cost you €5 and is open on the weekends and bank holidays.
Little insider tip for you, if you manage to park near the Glendalough Woollen Mills in Laragh, there is a pleasant forest walk starting behind the mills. It’ll take you straight to Glendalough in about 15-20 minutes.
For more information on parking your car in Glendalough, click here.
GlendaloughGlendalough

3. BEST TIME TO VISIT

Glendalough is open all year round, 24/7 but as I mentioned before it can get busy during the weekends, bank holidays and school holidays. Not only the car parks will be congested at these times but you will find the Monastic City and generally the grounds surrounding the two lakes quite crowded at these times. However, you’ll probably find some peace and quiet on your hikes. In summary, a day in the middle of the week and in the low season would be ideal!

Ireland can be touch and go when it comes to the weather… to put it mildly. From my own experience, the most pleasant months are May, June and September, which is great news for you as they’re not quite in the high season bracket.
In terms of seasons, there’s beauty to be found in each and every one of them. Glendalough is bursting with interesting fauna and flora which come and go at different times of the year. The Summers are green and lush, the gorse and heather splash the valley with joyful yellow and purple flowers. Springs come with the bluebells in the oak woodland and the Autumns turn the trees rust and gold. I am not sure I would actually recommend Winters although I’m sure it’s equally beautiful especially as the Wicklow Mountains are often the first area to get hit with snow. But Ireland is pretty much one giant storm from November to March so please bear in mind the weather conditions can be quite drastic. Moreover, if you intend to hike, some of the pathway are boardwalks so it can get quite slippery up there with snow or rain conditions.

4. ACCOMMODATION AND FOOD

You’ll have guessed it by now, if you don’t own or rent a car, your best bet to explore the hiking trails of Glendalough at your leisure is to find an accommodation nearby.
You have several options. On the site of Glendalough, you’ll find a hotel, a hostel and a couple of B&Bs. The closest town is Laragh which is a good 20 minute walk away. There you’ll find a few bed and breakfasts, hotels and airbnbs. But don’t stray too far away if you’re strictly on foot as you’ll need some energy left to hike in Glendalough.
When I visited, I went for a place on Trooper Hill, which is 1.5 hour walk away. It wasn’t the easiest on my legs, especially as you can imagine, my accommodation was located on a steep hill so coming home was rather arduous.
Worth a mention, Laragh Village has a bike hire shop with some fancy e-bikes that will make your exploring a lot easier. It is located next to the hotel Lynhams of Laragh.

When it comes to food, I was told by my host that the Glendalough Hotel has a very nice restaurant and bar. On the parking lot next to the Upper Lake, you’ll find food stalls that sell coffee, ice-cream and the usual chipper fare. I had a veggie burger and chips and you’ll hear absolutely no complaint from me. I thought it was actually a decent portion for the price but then I live in Dublin so most of the time I find everything cheap elsewhere. If you’re looking for a healthier option, you’ll probably have to pack some  food with you. Laragh Village has a few eateries and the cafe/deli The Glendalough Green has a tasty selection of foods that would be great in a picnic. I’d definitely suggest you take plenty of water and snacks (or even a picnic) with you if you intend on hiking. The longest hike is 4 hour long which can be done between meals but you never know!

5. WHAT TO PACK AND WEAR

It’s true what they say about the Irish weather, it is wildly unpredictable. Don’t be surprised if blazing sunshine is immediately followed by thunder and sleet. So the key to dressing here is definitely layers. You’ll want to check the weather cast before leaving and pack a weather-appropriate jacket, good footwear (if it rains or snows, make sure they come with gripping soles as the boardwalks at the top can be slippery). Make sure the clothes you wear are comfortable and breathable (go for natural textiles but avoid jeans as they take too long to dry if you get soaked). If the sun’s out, take your sunglasses and a hat.

In your bag, you’ll need:
– your phone, fully-charged (save the mountain emergency number, 999 or 112)
– rainproof jacket
– flask of water
– snacks (or picnic depending on the length of your hike)
– a map of the trails (you can pick it up for 50 cents at the Information Office, the Visitor Centre or you can download it for free on your phone via this link)
– sunscreen if it’s sunny
– if you plan on going off-track in the neighbouring valleys, take a compass
For more information on hiking responsibly in the Irish mountains, click here.

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6. HIKING TRAILS

There are 9 waymarked trails on site. They range from ‘easy’ to more arduous ‘hill walks’. The shortest walk (1km) takes 30 minute to complete while the longest (11km) can be completed in about 4 hours.
All of the trails start at the National Park Information Centre near Upper Lake. If you’re looking for a guided walk, they can be arranged in the centre. Displays of the trail map can be found next to Visitor Centre and the Information Centre (inside, you can buy a map for 50 cents -or download it here for free).
The easiest trails wrap around the two lakes while the most challenging ones will lead you to the Poulanass Waterfall, the Spinc and further in the neighbouring valleys (Lugduff, Glendasan and Glenealo Valley). Some of them link with county Wicklow’s big hiking trails like St Kevin’s Way or the Wicklow Way.

 

I hope this posts answers all your question and you feel ready to explore the Glendalough Valley. If you’re on Instagram, do tag me @theartofexploring, I would love to see your pictures! Let me know in the comments if you think I missed something and I’ll get back to you.