Bruges’ Best Photo Spots

bruges Belgium brugge

Bruges is the ultimate photographers’ dream. At almost every corner, there’s a chance to uncover a picturesque little scene that will make you want to grab your camera. It is one of the most well-preserved medieval towns in Europe and as such its historic centre is a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2000. It is a treasure trove of Renaissance and gothic architecture.
I recently spent an afternoon in the ‘Venice of the North’ and these were the 5 most instagrammable spots I found, but of course there are many more. I’m only really scratching the surface with this post.

bruges belgium

Generally, my favourite thing to photograph was the cobbled streets, not one in particular but I especially loved the ones lined with rows of houses with crow-stepped gables, typical of Dutch and Belgian architecture.
The one pictured above is called Sint-Jakobstraat and it’s quite magical really. First you’re met with an old-looking well, next to it there’s this cute homeware shop ‘Serendipity’, doors and windows are painted in a vibrant blue and just behind the bend, you’ll be met quite unexpectedly with the majestic St James Church. Now onto the 5 best photo spots in Bruges.

bruges markt belgium
1. MARKT

Located in the heart of Bruges, Markt is the city’s main square. It is surrounded by colourful guild houses that have now all been converted to restaurants. There’s also the West Flanders Provincial Court, the Belfry and its courtyard called the Cloth Hall, the statues of Jan Breydel and Pieter de Coninck who fought in the Flemish resistance, frietkotten (chipper stalls) and horse carts.
On Wednesdays, it is market day, a function the square has taken since 958.

bruges belgium
2. THE TOP OF THE BELFRY

This medieval bell tower was once an observation post to spot fires and other dangers but today, you can climb the 366 steps to access the best view of Bruges. At 83m (272 feet) high, the views over the city and around will take your breath away. I especially loved seeing all the colourful houses on Markt from above.
Please note that the staircase is really quite narrow so best keep the climb for off-peak times.

rozenhoedkaai bruges belgium
3. ROZENHOEDKAAI

This cinematic corner where the Groenerei and Dijver canals meet is one of the most photographed spots in Bruges. Rozenhoedkaai, meaning ‘Quay of the Rosary’, refers to a time where the rosary sellers would set up shop here, back in the 15th century. Before this quay was a port for salt traders who would come here to moor their ship and unload their merchandise.
Today, this is the starting point of many boat trips and a view that tourists from all over the world come to capture.

st bonifacius bruges belgium
4. BONIFACIUS BRIDGE

Located in the peaceful Arents courtyard, Bonifacius bridge is one romantic-looking little bridge. It spans over a murmuring canal lined with overhanging half-timbered houses with tudor-like windows. The scene couldn’t be more idyllic. Overlooking the bridge is Church of Our Lady which is the tallest building in Bruges.
Don’t let this bridge’s old-worldly charms fool you, it is actually one of the youngest bridges in the city as it only dates back to the early 20th century.

blinde ezelstraat bruges belgium
5. BLINDE EZEL-STRAAT

Blinde Ezel-straat, or ‘Blind Donkey Alley’, is the narrow street that joins Burg Square to the Fish Market. With your back to the Fish Market, you’ll see the gorgeous baroque archway that connects the City Hall to the Old Courthouse. Those types of bridges always evoke hushed secret meetings to me.
If you wonder where the name of this street comes from, there’s a legend attached to it. The story says that when people from Ghent came to steal Bruges’ dragon, they transported it on a cart pulled by a donkey. To stop their escape, the people from Bruges decided to blind the poor animal and this is where they rescued the dragon.
Another explanation, a bit more sensible this one, could stem from the name of the inn that once was located on this street. Its name, The Blind Donkey you might have guessed it, was a reference to the donkeys that were working at the treadmill of the malt house. It was custom to blindfold them so they don’t get bored.

 

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3 thoughts on “Bruges’ Best Photo Spots

  1. Pingback: A Quick Guide to an Afternoon in Ghent | The Art of Exploring

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